National Concussion Awareness Day

Today is National Concussion Awareness Day, started by Brooke Mills in 2016.

https://nationalconcussionawarenessday.com

#NationalConcussionAwarenessDay

#ConcussionAwarenessDay

National Concussion Awareness Day is celebrated on the 3rd Friday of September. Bringing awareness prompts you to study the signs of concussions and take them seriously, as they are a brain injury.

Concussions have become an epidemic in the United States, with millions of traumatic brain injuries happening each year.

A concussion should be suspected if there have been both: A blow to, or sudden whiplash injury of, the head, and any of the following symptoms:


•Headache
•Dizziness or poor balance
•Sensitivity to light or noise
•Blurry vision
•Feeling in a fog
•Feeling generally not right
•Trouble sleeping
•Drowsiness
•Trouble concentrating or remembering
•Irritability or emotionality
•Fatigue
•Confusion
•Sadness
•Nervousness or anxiety
•Brief loss of consciousness

If an individual experiences a hit to the head coupled with any of the above symptoms, a concussion should be suspected and the individual should be removed from sports until evaluated by a provider trained in concussion care.

As concussion gains more of an international spotlight, there’s still a shortage of doctors equipped to handle concussions.

https://www.concussion.org/news/national-concussion-awareness-day/

http://www.hopetbi.com #hope_tbi

9/11 – We Remember

Do you remember where you were? I do!

On September 11, 2001 our Country and the global community would endure something that scarred its heart, shook us to the core, and struck fear in the lives of many around the world.

More than 90 Countries lost citizens in a series of attacks.

It was a time we all became painfully and acutely aware that freedom is indeed not free. Our resilience is what unites us. Unity is what helped us get through it. Unity is what will help us to keep surviving.

We will never forget!

Here are the names of the people who have died from 911 Attacks. WE REMEMBER!!!

https://www.911memorial.org/visit/memorial/names-911-memorial

During the September 11 attacks in 2001, a total of 2,751 victims were confirmed to have died in the initial attacks.

September 11 by the numbers. The amounts are just inconceivable.

https://nymag.com/news/articles/wtc/1year/numbers.htm

As of August 2013, medical authorities concluded that 1,140 people who worked, lived, or studied in Lower Manhattan at the time of the attack have been diagnosed with cancer as a result of “exposure to toxins at Ground Zero

2,977 people were totalling in the aftermath of the tragedy – this included 19 hijackers that committed murder–suicide, and more than 6,000 others were injured.The immediate deaths included 265 on the four planes (including the terrorists), 2,606 in the World Trade Center and in the surrounding area, and 125 at the Pentagon.

Most of those who perished were civilians except for 343 firefighters; 71 law enforcement officers who died in the World Trade Center and on the ground in New York City; another law enforcement officer who died when United Airlines Flight 93 crashed into a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania; 55 military personnel who died at the Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia; and the 19 terrorists who died on board the four aircraft.

1,647 people who died have been identified through DNA

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/2-people-killed-world-trade-center-9-11-identified-dna-n1278723

The attacks remain the deadliest terrorist act in world history.[

https://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2021-09-10/counting-the-lives-lost-as-a-result-of-9-11

History should have taught us something.

HOPE TBI Co-OP and Exchange

Come visit us at the HOPE TBI Co-op and Exchange. Currently serving The United States and US Territories.

Please do NOT list items for sale here! We are a Co-Op/Exchange Group Only (no monies exchanged)!!!

Remember to Bookmark this Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/HOPETBICoOpExchange/

This group is to list durable medical equipment, supplies, technology, machinery, prosthetics, etc. that you are ‘gifting” for FREE to someone in need.

You may also post a request if you are needing something as well. Please only request item(s) if unable to acquire by any other means. No acquiring items just to sell them.

THIS GROUP IS NOT OPEN TO VENDORS.

[Disclaimer: This group does not support or endorse the exchange of medications or supplements in any form. Please see your medical providers for those needs. This Group or its Owners/Moderators are not responsible for any transactions, equipment, or product exchanges with another member]

    Gifted Items/Needed items can be, but are not limited to: vehicles, hospital beds, wheelchairs, braces, ventilator equipment, oxygen concentrators, traction equipment, personal care aids, books, Posey Lifts, adaptive equipment, Manuals/information, Bathing Supplies, mobility aids, etc – and other items useful to a person with a disability or injury. The sharing opportunities are endless.

We realize that Insurance does not always cover all the needs a person has after experiencing a devastating and catastrophic medical emergency. We also realize not everyone has insurance. We understand being financially strapped, destitute, or handicapped after a life changing medical event.

Being a member of this Group does not imply nor guarantee that you will have your needs met or provided, but merely an additional opportunity to network with those who may be able to help directly or indirectly.

This Group will also allow you the opportunity to share your fundraising pages or place to post your public funding request page links (like Go Fund Me Page, PostHope page, Pay It Forward Page, YouCaring page, Give Forward, Donors Choose, etc). Be prepared to be vetted for authenticity.

It is strongly advised that if you meet anyone offline, that you do so in a public and safe location.


Our 2 Newest HOPEsters – Debbie and Kris

#MoreThanMyBrainInjury

We want to introduce a Survivor story and a Caregiver story.  The battle for survival and quality of life continues with these two powerful stories.  

 

Debbie Webb – “The year was 1990, I was practicing barrel racing and the horse I was riding slipped onto her side.  Upon impact with the ground, I was immediately unconscious.”  Check out her story here: 

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Kris Ruckle-Mahon – “My role went from being a parent to a caregiver on April 11, 2007, something I was not financially prepared for. I was fortunate though, to have a great work and family support system to help us through it.”  Check out her story here:

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Our Newest HOPEster Chasity

Grab a cup of tea or coffee and snuggle in for a read of the Survivor story about Chasity Christian. A survivor of many traumas and how love is carried in different forms – from our newest HOPEster.

#MoreThanMyBrainInjury

Chasity Lee Christian – Survivor

New Page Added – Clinical Neuroendocrinologists

Hello HOPEsters. We are thrilled to be able to share with you a list we have tirelessly compiled of “clinically practicing” Neuroendocrinologists who provide direct patient care.

This is not an all inclusive list and does not include Neuroendocrinologists that are  “researchers or lecturers” only.

Let us know of any others that are not on the list and we would be glad to add them.

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Also check out our Neuroendocrinology page as well, if you haven’t already done so.

Brain Injury Radio and Other Outreach

Check out our latest additions to our Publications, Radio and Outreach page.

PUBLICATIONS, RADIO, and OUTREACH

Check out all the pages under our AWARENESS MATTERS tab:

HOPE TBI Awareness

Publications Radio and Outreach

Support Groups Sites and Books

Supports Sponsor and Recommended Charity Opportunities

Polytrauma/Orthopedic Resource Pages

TBI Resource Pages

Neuroscience In The News

Michelle and Joe Patnesky – Parents of Hailee

Check out the story about a mom fighting for the life and proper care of her daughter who was hit by a car January 2021.

When doctors and therapists don’t have faith, sometimes a family’s love and prayers can work miracles.

Michelle Patnesky, the mom of 17 year old Hailee, takes us on a journey with her family as they traverse the system to advocate for their daughter who has sustained a severe brain injury and remains in the hospital.

https://hopetbi.com/michelle-patnesky-caregiver/

Help me welcome our newest HOPE’sters!

Introducing Vera Quijano – Survivor

Check out our newest story submission. at HOPE TBI www.hopetbi.com

Vera Quijano, a dance and yoga Instructor, who is now dancing to the beat of a different drum after sustaining a Traumatic Brain Injury after surviving a vehicle accident, where she was hit by a drunk driver.

Check out her video interview here:https://hopetbi.com/vera-quijano-survivor/

Also check out a song she wrote about her journey called “Post Concussionist” here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKLVx5em_fo

At HOPE TBI we welcome Vera as our latest HOPE’ster!!!

Brain Injury Awareness Month

Brain Injury Awareness Month
Join the  #MoreThanMyBrainInjury 
Campaign this March

The Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) leads the nation in observing Brain Injury Awareness Month by conducting an awareness campaign in March each year.

The Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) theme for the 2021 to 2023 campaign is More Than My Brain Injury.

About Brain Injury

#hope_tbi

Down The Rabbit Hole during COVID-19

Brain Injury Radio Show

Kim and Caren discussed, reaching out and staying connected during this difficult time in our history. We discussed tips and ways to stay connected.

We took callers .. Interested in hearing how our listeners are coping with the “New World” and their thoughts, fears, feelings.

This show is a gathering place for anyone seeking recovery from the challenges of life on life’s terms. We discuss useful tools that have helped us lighten the load, of our journey through recovery. This is a “we” recovery program, because it is in the “we,” that we find the new “me.”

We focus on the four A’s of Recovery: Awareness, Acceptance, Action and Adaptation. This is a place for survivor’s striving to become thrivers, which takes a large dose of Warrior!

Hosted by Kim Justus, author of In a Flash: Miracles Here and Beyond found at inaflash.org & “Like” at facebook.com/inaflash.org   Co-Host is Caren Robinson found at: hopetbi.com

LISTEN TO SHOW HERE

 

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Thank you for visiting the HOPE TBI Website.

Please take the time to make a comment, share your thoughts, and tell us what impacted you the most and what brought you here:

https://hopetbi.com/reviews-and-testimonials/

Your input is important to the development and growth of this website, and we like to know what is going on out there in your thoughts.

Thank you for visiting us! We look forward to hearing from you.

The Dirty Dozen – 12 Ways To Cope With Memory Loss

It can be very frustrating if your life is being negatively impacted by your memory loss and someone (often a friend, provider, or relative) who doesn’t truly understand your experience says, “Oh, I forget things too…”

You may hear some people say that everyone has memory loss, especially as we get older.  To some extent that is a true statement.  We all have moments where we walk into a room and forget what we walked in there for, or forget where we laid the keys down at.  However, here is where it differs. Memory loss as a result of a disease process, injury, or due to the use of certain medications is different than the memory loss we experience as part of the natural aging experience.

Several conditions, other than aging can cause significant memory loss.  Some of these may be reversible with treatment.  Some are permanent, even after treatment. Regardless of whether reversible or permanent,  if it is effecting your life in a negative way, or robbing your quality of life, you may find some of the tips below to be helpful in helping you manage the memory loss you or a loved one may be experiencing

Some examples of memory loss that are not included in the natural aging process are the following:

  • Brain injuries – traumatic or acquired (such as blunt force trauma, accident, encephalopathy, falls, blood clots, stroke, transient ischemic attack, aneurysm, medications, drugs, etc)
  • Result of brain surgery (all surgeries carry risk, especially surgeries involving the brain – examples may include shunts, removal of diseased tissue or tumors, repairing bleeds, repairing puncture or crushed wounds, etc)
  • Brain Diseases (like a tumor, hydrocephalus – fluid in brain, or other rare disorders) and other Diseases (like Huntington’s, Muscular Dystrophy, Parkinson’s Disease)
  • Infections of the brain – such as syphillis, HIV/AIDS, Lyme Disease, other viruses
  • Vitamin B1 or B12 deficiency – good nutrition is imperative for brain health
  • Hypothyroidism  ( a common secondary condition that can be acquired after head injury and often undertreated; some can be hereditary and if left untreated can exacerbate symptoms)
  • Kidney or Liver disorders
  • Dementia/Alzheimer’s  (may be acquired secondary to brain injury, inherited, or from other unknown processes)
  • Emotional Disorders – stress, anxiety or depression can cause forgetfulness, confusion, difficulty concentrating and other problems that interrupt the ability to function in daily life)
  • Alcoholism, smoking, or drug use
  • Sleep Deprivation – quantity and quality of sleep affect our memory processing

Here are 12 ways that may help you manage your memory loss in a more functional way, helping to maintain as much dignity and independence as possible.

  1. Make a memory board (with important names and frequently used phone whiteboard2numbers).  Hang somewhere visible, so it can be seen and utilized daily.  Update the same day weekly or as schedules change.
  2. Create a life story book, photo album or something digital that is labeled to help identify who and what is important to remember (people, places, experiences).  Get assistance to from someone you trust (such as a family member or professional) to do this. This can include pictures, question and answer format, or whatever works for your particular needs. This serves as a dual purpose as well, as it can also be used by professionals or caregivers to understand more about you as well.
  3. Cognitive stimulation. This involves activities and exercises that stimulate thinking, concentration, communication and memory. braingamesgenderUtilizing brain exercise sites such as  Lumosity , Constant Therapy, and CogniFit Brain Training; play strategy games (like cards, checkers, chess, crossword puzzles, word finds, puzzles); coloring, drawing, or listening to different types of music.
  4. Utilize a reminder system (this may include calendar, white boards, chart on the wall).  It could be color coded as well (so a different color for each person or different color for each appointment on schedule – just make sure you use same color each time you do the schedule). Using A Planner or a Calendar App? –  write down things right away – without exception. Always keep the planner with you wherever you go.  If you get a call about an appointment, write it down IN THE PLANNER.planner  If something changes in the schedule, write it down IN THE PLANNER.  Label cupboards and storage containers as a reminder of where things are kept; label doors as a reminder of which room is which.
  5. LISTS are your friends and great reminders (note: if you have trouble writing, use a voice recorder or dictaphone to make lists).  Consider making permanent signs – even having them laminated, to remind you of things you need to do regularly (for example – sign by the sink reminding you to wash your hands before cooking or before leaving the bathroom).  Make a list for things you are running out of and leave attached to the refrigerator door (this is a great way to make a grocery list you take to the store with you).  Make a list of what bills are due on what days and how much each bill is that is due, along with how it is paid.  Make a list of daily tasks that need accomplished.  Make (or have someone make) a checklist to hang by the front door that includes what you need when you leave (for example: purse/wallet, phone, phone charger, planner, meds, bottle of water, keys, sunglasses, ear plugs, jacket, etc).  Use the checklist EVERY TIME before you walk out the door.  This reduces chances of forgetting things.
  6. stickynotesUse post-it/sticky notes. You can use them anywhere in your home or personal workspace to remind you to do specific tasks (such as a sticky on a library book that has to be returned by a certain date, or start load of laundry today, etc).Once you have completed the task, it’s important to throw the post-it/sticky note away. This way you won’t accidentally redo what you already finished.
  7. Use a mobile smartphone (cell phone). Many mobile phones have a built-in voice recorder. Use this  to record information that you need to remember or add items to your virtual calendar. You could also leave recorded notes, play it back later, or review those notes at the same time each day.  Also cell phones are great resources for text reminders, checking emails, and having access to a GPS (such as Google maps) to utilize to keep from getting lost. Use your phone to take picture of your whiteboard schedule that week so when you leave home you can look at the picture even if you aren’t at home to see it.  Use an app to record incoming/outgoing phone calls (check your State or Country laws first though, about recording these in your particular location).
  8. Medicine/Pill reminder box.  This will help you see whether you have taken your medications for that day (this helps to prevent taking your medications more than once). Some models have am/pm, and other times of the day; pillboxsome can be set to remind you when to take your pills, with an alarm, vibration or flashing light.
  9. Use an alarm clock, a watch with an alarm, or a kitchen timer to remind you when you need to leave the house for an ­appointment, or when you have to check something cooking in the oven. Write down why you have set the alarm – so you know why it is ­going off. (I cannot tell you the number of times I have had an alarm going off and then sat there wondering why I set it. So notes are very helpful – put by the alarm)
  10. Never leave the room when you are cooking.  You may forget what you were doing and this increases risk of burning your food, burning up a pan, or causing a fire.  Never leave the room when water is running in a sink or bathtub. You may forget about it and cause a flood.
  11. Appointments and Meetings. In advance, make a detailed list of what you want to say, questions you have, agenda for meeting, etc.  If you are going to a medical appointment, bring a pre-typed list to leave with the provider of all other providers/specialists (make sure this includes their addresses, phone numbers or contact informatioLeadership with educationn), all medications and their dosages (remember to list any herbs, supplements taking), and list of concerns. Record meetings or appointments to go back and listen to later and take notes from the recording.
  12. Don’t procrastinate. Whenever possible, doing things when they’re on your mind rather than later so you don’t have to worry about forgetting them. Try to utilize the same routine every day as much as possible.  Routine reduces chances of forgetting.