Biomarkers – Blood Work for TBI

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Scientists are looking to biomarkers, or biological indicators, in the blood to help them differentiate between brain injuries of different severities. For example, there may be an increase of a specific biomarker in the blood of a patient with a severe injury that wouldn’t be present in a patient with a mild injury. When doctors are better able to determine the severity of an injury, they can make sure patients get the right care at the right time, and that could make a big improvement in their prognoses.

Some of the biomarkers used are the following:

•Known as Banyan BTI (Brain Trauma Indicator), the new test measures levels of two protein biomarkers — ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein — that are released from the brain into blood within 12 hours of head injury.

The Brain Trauma Indicator blood test the levels of two proteins, UCH-L1 and GFAP. Upon brain injury, these proteins are released from the brain into the blood. If found at elevated levels, brain damage, with intracranial lesions, normally otherwise only visible on a CT scan, is suggested. Levels of these blood proteins after mTBI can help predict which patients may have intracranial lesions visible by CT scan and which won’t.

To give approval, FDA used data from a clinical study of 1,947 individual blood samples from adults with suspected TBI and compared blood test results with CT scan results. How did the blood test perform? It was able to predict the presence of intracranial lesions on a CT scan 97.5 percent of the time and those who did not have intracranial lesions on a CT scan 99.6 percent of the time.

•Levels of one protein, called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), taken within 24 hours of someone’s head injury, could predict the severity of a TBI and how a patient would fare, they found.

While healthy people averaged 60 nanograms per milliliter of BDNF in their bloodstreams, patients with brain injuries had less than one-third of that amount, averaging less than 20 nanograms per milliliter, and those with the most severe TBIs had even lower levels, around 4 nanograms per milliliter. Moreover, patients with high levels of BDNF had mostly recovered from their injuries six months later. But in patients with the lowest levels of BDNF, symptoms still lingered at follow-up. The results suggest that a test for BDNF levels, administered in the emergency room, could help stratify patients.

•Tau protein (MAPT) possible biomarker for traumatic brain injury . The formation and accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau. APT is a neuronal protein that plays an important role in axonal stabilization, neuronal development, and neuronal polarity. MAPT release into the CSF and blood has been interpreted as indicative of axonal injury.

It is believed that this biomarker may prove helpful in identifying high-risk patients with mTBI. However, additional studies are needed to establish the diagnostic value of serum tau in detecting traumatic brain injury in patients with mTBI.

(all information compiled from various sources)

Your Life Is the Miracle

I am grateful for so much.  The opportunities that life continues to give us to be together and grow as a family and as individuals.Miracleyouare

The last four years since the wreck have been crazy, intense, horrible, disappointing, amazing and life changing. We have had high highs and low lows.  There were times we didn’t know how we would make it to the next day, next week, or next month.

What we miss seeing at times is that we are all just passing time and occupy our chairs very briefly. We never know when that time will be altered. The time I have been given with my family is a gift.  We can let our experiences make us bitter or better.  We can be caught up in the darkness of our experiences or be guided by the light of strength, perseverance, and embrace the little miracles of the recovery process.

Some say we have had more than our share of loss. I see God’s light in my family every day. I may not understand the loss, pain, triumphs, and blessings – however I trust in the plan that is laid out for us and endeavor to accomplish as much as I can to live up to the gift I have been given by the miracle and grace of having survived so much.

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NEW STORIES – Matters of the Heart

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I am a Survivor trying to bring inspiration and awareness about Polytrauma and TBI to others.

33 Months ago, our Website Page for YOUR STORIES went LIVE.  Since then, we have met some amazing folks and had the opportunity to share their stories, experiences, and soulful expressions with all of you out there.

If you have not submitted your own story.  You can do that by starting HERE.

Survivors, Caregivers, Providers; Parents, family, or friends – share your story to be published on this site today.  We are glad to help you in any way we are capable.

We have recently finished Stories for various folks that we would like to share with you.  Take a look, read some, leave a comment at the bottom of their story if you choose, and pass the link on.

Let’s bring Global Awareness to Polytrauma and TBI
NEW SUBMISSIONS:        Murray Dunlap – Survivor
                                             Bobby Porter – Caregiver
                                        Jason Stockman – Survivor
                                             Tiffany McCullock – Survivor

Be A HOPEster!

WHAT IS A HOPEster?

A HOPEster is anyone who is interested in helping one person succeed to be independent – even if the person they are currently helping is themselves (specifically related to Polytrauma and Traumatic Brain Injury – though can apply to anything other than these two things as well).

A HOPEster is someone willing to share information, offer support (whether that be emotional, mental, physical, or just by sharing awareness information), and encourages advocacy (self-advocacy, medical advocacy, advocacy awareness).

A HOPEster is someone that thinks outside the box, is passionate, idealistic, and believes in the inherent goodness of others and our collective responsibility to each other as human beings.proud-to-be-a-hopester

https://hopetbi.com/awareness-matters/hope-tbi-awareness/

Brain Injury Reversed In Toddler

Science is miraculous….HBOT therapy that reversed brain damage in toddler.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1933056560320331&id=1850833625209292

Story Submission Page – UPDATED

Check out our updated Story Submission Page.

Now with Caregiver and Survivor Writing Prompts

You do not have to be a writer to tell your story. Just willing to share it with someone.

https://hopetbi.com/your-stories/story-submission-guide/

Caregiver Story Prompt

Hello there. Thank you for your interest and considering our site www.hopetbi.com to share your story. I would be honored to tell your story as you wish to share it. We are glad to correct spelling so don’t worry about that.

I want you to be able to tell your story your way. Some things to include in your story that people often have questions about, are listed in the questions below….

Please feel free to add more than the questions listed. This is just a helpful starting point for a Caregiver story:

  1. What happened to cause you to become a Caregiver for Polytrauma or TBI?

  2. What injuries did they sustain?

  3. When did this occur (Date or Season and Year, or)

  4. How old were you when you became a Caregiver?

  5. How old is the person who acquired the TBI or Trauma? How many concussions or TBI’s have they had? How old are they now?

  6. How Long was their recovery? If still recovering what are you involved in helping them with, regarding care?

  7. Can you identify what your biggest struggles are or have been over the weeks/months/years as a Caregiver?

  8. What things do you do for self-care (to cope, take breaks, stay refreshed)?

  9. Were you financially prepared to take on being a Caregiver?

  10. Did you have any special training for the injuries of the person you are/were a Caregiver for?

  11. How has being a Caregiver affected your physical and mental health?

  12. Have you had the social support and resources you needed to provide the care needed?

  13. How has being a Caregiver impacted your relationship with that person since their injuries?

  14. Where do you go to connect to other Caregivers like yourself?

  15. What are some of your hope and fears regarding this whole journey as a Caregiver?

  16. Where do you live now (State, Country)?

  17. What do you want other people to know about your experiences?

  18. Why did you choose to tell your story?

  19. What name do you want represented online (first and last please)

  20. Do you have any pictures you want to submit of the before, during, or after? (accident, hospital stay, incident, etc?)

Ways to submit your story:

  • Writing it and submitting a saved PDF version of your story,
  • Emailing your story to hopetbi4ever@gmail.com.
  • Videotaping yourself telling your story and then we can type it up; or submitting a voice recording telling your story; and please consider submitting pictures to validate your story and make it more personal to others

Who can submit a story? Survivor, Healthcare Provider, Caregiver, Family relative, friend, etc.

Can a story be submitted for someone who has died? Yes, if their story involved sustaining a Traumatic Brain Injury or bodily trauma, and their death was a result of bodily trauma and or Traumatic Brain Injury/Acquired Brain Injury. Please message if you have any questions. You can be the voice of their story if you knew them personally.

Also for you to know…I am not representing any business and there is no compensation for sharing your story. I am a Survivor and saw a need I wanted to help with as much as possible. We post stories on our site to give people a voice to tell their story and a place where others can read it.

E-publish simply means (for our purposes) to post on our site.